Age Related Macular Degeneration Treatment Farmington NM

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Age Related Macular Degeneration Treatment. You will find informative articles about Age Related Macular Degeneration Treatment, including "Age Related Macular Degeneration". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Farmington, NM that can help answer your questions about Age Related Macular Degeneration Treatment.

Ryan Brent Anderson, MD
(505) 327-0406
2300 E 30th St Ste 105
Farmington, NM
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Ponce Sch Of Med, Ponce Pr 00732
Graduation Year: 2001

Data Provided By:
Duane A Wiggins, MD
(505) 325-4003
622 W Maple St Ste E
Farmington, NM
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tx Med Branch Galveston, Galveston Tx 77550
Graduation Year: 1995

Data Provided By:
Mi-Kyoung Song MD
Eye Associates-New Mexico
(505) 325-4003
622 W Maple St # E
Farmington, NM
 
R P Herrera
Vision Mart
(505) 325-2020
520 E Main St
Farmington, NM
 
Duane A Wiggins
(505) 325-4003
622 W Maple St
Farmington, NM
Specialty
Ophthalmology

Data Provided By:
Michael G Haas, MD
622 W Maple St
Farmington, NM
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Washington
Graduation Year: 2001

Data Provided By:
Scott Danl Allen, MD
(505) 327-0406
2300 E 30th St Ste 105
Farmington, NM
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ca, Los Angeles, Ucla Sch Of Med, Los Angeles Ca 90024
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided By:
Cathy Tibbetts OD
Bloomfield Family Vision
(505) 326-7272
4250 E Main St
Farmington, NM
 
Ian Kirste OD
Quick Vision
(505) 564-3126
4500 E Main St
Farmington, NM
 
Scott D Allen
(505) 327-0406
2300 E 30th St
Farmington, NM
Specialty
Ophthalmology

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Age Related Macular Degeneration


There are a number of reasons why people may develop AMD, including increasing age, genetic and hereditary factors, and environmental risk factors. Since pigment in the eyes appears to be protective, Caucasians, particularly women, appear to be at greater risk. Smoking, family history, nutrition, and sunlight exposure over the course of one's lifetime may also play a role.

There are two forms of AMD, a more common dry form and a less common wet form. In the dry form, which affects 90% of AMD patients, aging deposits called drusen become deposited underneath the macula. In the vast majority of patients, these drusen cause no visual changes; however, in some the drusen can cause the macula to thin, resulting in a slow, gradual decrease in central vision. If the drusen cause substantial weakening of important layers in the macula, the wet form of AMD may then develop. Wet AMD develops when abnormal blood vessels start to grow through the layers of the macula that have been weakened by the dry form of AMD. These abnormal blood vessels can cause bleeding, leakage of fluid, and the formation of scar tissue, which in turn can lead to a rapid and severe loss of central vision. Although only 1 in 10 patients with AMD will convert from the dry to the wet form, the wet form accounts for 90% of the vision loss associated with AMD. The chance of a patient with dry AMD converting to the more agressive wet form is approximately 2% each year...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Eyes-and-Vision.com