Age Related Macular Degeneration Treatment Longmeadow MA

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Larry A Litscher, MD
(413) 525-8601
382 N Main St Ste 101
East Longmeadow, MA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Mc Gill Univ, Fac Of Med, Montreal, Que, Canada
Graduation Year: 1978

Data Provided By:
Steven Thomas Berger, MD
(413) 783-3100
275 Bicentennial Hwy
Springfield, MA
Specialties
Ophthalmology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Cornell Univ Med Coll, New York Ny 10021
Graduation Year: 1985
Hospital
Hospital: Baystate Med Ctr, Springfield, Ma

Data Provided By:
William Charles Seefeld, MD
(413) 783-3100
275 Bicentennial Hwy
Springfield, MA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Columbia Univ Coll Of Physicians And Surgeons, New York Ny 10032
Graduation Year: 1985
Hospital
Hospital: Mercy Hospital, Springfield, Ma; Baystate Med Ctr, Springfield, Ma
Group Practice: Baystate Eye Care

Data Provided By:
John Joseph Papale, MD
(413) 782-0030
1515 Allen St
Springfield, MA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ct Sch Of Med, Farmington Ct 06032
Graduation Year: 1979
Hospital
Hospital: Mercy Hospital, Springfield, Ma; Baystate Med Ctr, Springfield, Ma
Group Practice: Baystate Eye Care

Data Provided By:
Pamela Renee Henderson, MD
(860) 437-3937
1319 Bigelow Commons
Enfield, CT
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mi Med Sch, Ann Arbor Mi 48109
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided By:
Joseph Peter Bouvier Jr, MD
Longmeadow, MA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Columbia Univ Coll Of Physicians And Surgeons, New York Ny 10032
Graduation Year: 1994

Data Provided By:
Susan Jean Batlan, MD
(607) 257-2760
305 Bicentennial Hwy
Springfield, MA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Mt Sinai Sch Of Med Of The City Univ Of Ny, New York Ny 10029
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided By:
Frank Joseph Mc Cabe, MD
(508) 856-2551
275 Bicentennial Hwy
Springfield, MA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ma Med Sch, Worcester Ma 01655
Graduation Year: 1995

Data Provided By:
Robert Michael Berger, MD
(413) 783-3100
275 Bicentennial Hwy
Springfield, MA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: New York Univ Sch Of Med, New York Ny 10016
Graduation Year: 1967
Hospital
Hospital: Mercy Hospital, Springfield, Ma; Baystate Med Ctr, Springfield, Ma
Group Practice: Baystate Eye Care

Data Provided By:
Peter Hamilton Judson, MD
9 Cranbrook Blvd
Enfield, CT
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Cornell Univ Med Coll, New York Ny 10021
Graduation Year: 1982

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Age Related Macular Degeneration


There are a number of reasons why people may develop AMD, including increasing age, genetic and hereditary factors, and environmental risk factors. Since pigment in the eyes appears to be protective, Caucasians, particularly women, appear to be at greater risk. Smoking, family history, nutrition, and sunlight exposure over the course of one's lifetime may also play a role.

There are two forms of AMD, a more common dry form and a less common wet form. In the dry form, which affects 90% of AMD patients, aging deposits called drusen become deposited underneath the macula. In the vast majority of patients, these drusen cause no visual changes; however, in some the drusen can cause the macula to thin, resulting in a slow, gradual decrease in central vision. If the drusen cause substantial weakening of important layers in the macula, the wet form of AMD may then develop. Wet AMD develops when abnormal blood vessels start to grow through the layers of the macula that have been weakened by the dry form of AMD. These abnormal blood vessels can cause bleeding, leakage of fluid, and the formation of scar tissue, which in turn can lead to a rapid and severe loss of central vision. Although only 1 in 10 patients with AMD will convert from the dry to the wet form, the wet form accounts for 90% of the vision loss associated with AMD. The chance of a patient with dry AMD converting to the more agressive wet form is approximately 2% each year...

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