Age Related Macular Degeneration Treatment Maple Valley WA

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Age Related Macular Degeneration Treatment. You will find informative articles about Age Related Macular Degeneration Treatment, including "Age Related Macular Degeneration". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Maple Valley, WA that can help answer your questions about Age Related Macular Degeneration Treatment.

Craig Michael Young, MD
(253) 631-2929
24020 132nd Ave SE
Kent, WA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Or Hlth Sci Univ Sch Of Med, Portland Or 97201
Graduation Year: 1978

Data Provided By:
Arthur B Lum, O.D
(253) 859-0942
11120 SE Kent Kangley RD
Kent, WA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Languages
english
Education
Graduation Year: 1950

Data Provided By:
David Joseph Mc Intyre, MD
(206) 646-4003
PO Box 2527
Issaquah, WA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Wa Sch Of Med, Seattle Wa 98195
Graduation Year: 1959

Data Provided By:
Monica B Vuong, MD
Renton, WA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Washington
Graduation Year: 1999

Data Provided By:
Aaron Perera Weingeist, MD
(253) 874-3969
1101 Harvey Rd
Auburn, WA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Languages
Italian, Spanish, Russian, Ukrainian
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ia Coll Of Med, Iowa City Ia 52242
Graduation Year: 1993
Hospital
Hospital: Auburn Reg Med Ctr, Auburn, Wa; Good Samaritan Hospital & Reha, Puyallup, Wa; St Joseph Hospital & Health Ca, Tacoma, Wa; Mary Bridge Children Health Ce, Tacoma, Wa; Tacoma General Hospital, Tacoma, Wa; Allenmore Hosp, Tacoma, Wa; St Clare Hospit

Data Provided By:
Robert E Maynard, MD
(425) 486-3937
6973 Coal Creek Pkwy SE
Newcastle, WA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Suny At Buffalo Sch Of Med & Biomedical Sci, Buffalo Ny 14214
Graduation Year: 1953
Hospital
Hospital: Overlake Hosp Med Ctr, Bellevue, Wa; Evergreen Hosp Med Ctr, Kirkland, Wa
Group Practice: Eye Clinic-Northshore

Data Provided By:
Michael Emeric Mockovak, MD
(425) 525-1000
900 SW 16th St Ste 200
Renton, WA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Yale Univ Sch Of Med, New Haven Ct 06510
Graduation Year: 1988

Data Provided By:
Richard Wilson Lomas, MD
(425) 255-0986
17800 Talbot Rd S
Renton, WA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Case Western Reserve Univ Sch Of Med, Cleveland Oh 44106
Graduation Year: 1957

Data Provided By:
Howard N Straub, DO
(425) 656-5345
3915 Talbot Rd S Ste 209
Renton, WA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Do, 1975, Univ Health Sciences - Coll Osteopathic
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided By:
Linda Elizabeth Day, MD
1101 Harvey Rd
Auburn, WA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: A Einstein Coll Of Med Of Yeshiva Univ, Bronx Ny 10461
Graduation Year: 1993

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Age Related Macular Degeneration


There are a number of reasons why people may develop AMD, including increasing age, genetic and hereditary factors, and environmental risk factors. Since pigment in the eyes appears to be protective, Caucasians, particularly women, appear to be at greater risk. Smoking, family history, nutrition, and sunlight exposure over the course of one's lifetime may also play a role.

There are two forms of AMD, a more common dry form and a less common wet form. In the dry form, which affects 90% of AMD patients, aging deposits called drusen become deposited underneath the macula. In the vast majority of patients, these drusen cause no visual changes; however, in some the drusen can cause the macula to thin, resulting in a slow, gradual decrease in central vision. If the drusen cause substantial weakening of important layers in the macula, the wet form of AMD may then develop. Wet AMD develops when abnormal blood vessels start to grow through the layers of the macula that have been weakened by the dry form of AMD. These abnormal blood vessels can cause bleeding, leakage of fluid, and the formation of scar tissue, which in turn can lead to a rapid and severe loss of central vision. Although only 1 in 10 patients with AMD will convert from the dry to the wet form, the wet form accounts for 90% of the vision loss associated with AMD. The chance of a patient with dry AMD converting to the more agressive wet form is approximately 2% each year...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Eyes-and-Vision.com