Contact Lenses Hurricane WV

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Contact Lenses. You will find informative articles about Contact Lenses, including "Contact Lense Materials, Types, History, Care and Wearing Tips". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Hurricane, WV that can help answer your questions about Contact Lenses.

DeVin Audric King
(304) 757-8700
1204 Hospital Dr
Hurricane, WV
Specialty
Ophthalmology

Data Provided By:
Muhib Shukri Tarakji
(304) 766-2101
418 Greenway Ave
South Charleston, WV
Specialty
Ophthalmology

Data Provided By:
Dr.STEPHEN GAAL
(304) 736-4942
595 Mall Road
Barboursville, WV
Gender
M
Speciality
Optometrist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Joseph Anthony Locascio
(304) 522-1055
5170 Us Route 60 East
Huntington, WV
Specialty
Ophthalmology

Data Provided By:
JamesW. Herman,O.D.
(304) 757-2533
Herman Eye Center,3709 Teays Valley Road
Hurricane, WV
 
Richard C Rashid
(304) 768-7373
4513 Maccorkle Ave Sw
South Charleston, WV
Specialty
Ophthalmology

Data Provided By:
Nicole M Rashid
(304) 768-7371
4513 Maccorkle Ave Sw
South Charleston, WV
Specialty
Ophthalmology

Data Provided By:
Michael A Krasnow
(304) 691-8800
5187 Us 60 East
Huntington, WV
Specialty
Ophthalmology

Data Provided By:
Mark D Steinvurzel
(304) 720-7200
24 Maccorkle Ave Sw
South Charleston, WV
Specialty
Ophthalmology

Data Provided By:
James W Herman OD
(304) 757-2533
3853 Teays Valley Rd
Hurricane, WV
Services
Optometrist

Data Provided By:

Contact Lense Materials, Types, History, Care and Wearing Tips

Many are surprised to learn that contact lenses have been around since the late 1920's. However they were made entirely of glass, and covered the entire eye, not just the cornea as they do today. This was uncomfortable to say the least! Even by the 1970's, contact lenses were made of a hard plastic that made it impossible for a patient's eye to receive oxygen to "breathe". The cornea needs to take in oxygen, expel carbon dioxide, and remain wet to function comfortably and properly.

During the 1970's though, new materials were developed for contacts that allowed them to breathe (gas permeable), and function well in a wet environment (hydrophilic). Contact lenses are now quite popular, worn by approximately 30 million people in the USA alone ...

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