Corneal Transplant Surgery Birmingham AL

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Dr.Brett Gerwin
(423) 756-1002
1201 11th Avenue South
Birmingham, AL
Gender
M
Speciality
Ophthalmologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided By:
James Witmer Taylor, MD
(912) 283-3155
930 South 20th Street,
Birmingham, AL
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Ga Sch Of Med, Augusta Ga 30912
Graduation Year: 1965

Data Provided By:
Harold Walter Skalka, MD
(205) 325-8625
1720 University Blvd
Birmingham, AL
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: New York Univ Sch Of Med, New York Ny 10016
Graduation Year: 1966

Data Provided By:
James Allen Kimble, MD
(205) 933-2625
1201 11th Ave S Ste 300
Birmingham, AL
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Co Sch Of Med, Denver Co 80262
Graduation Year: 1971
Hospital
Hospital: Cooper Green Hosp, Birmingham, Al; Callahan Eye Foundation Hosp, Birmingham, Al
Group Practice: Retina & Vitreous Assoc

Data Provided By:
Harold A Helms Jr, MD
(205) 933-2020
1100 23rd St S Ste 100
Birmingham, AL
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Al Sch Of Med, Birmingham Al 35294
Graduation Year: 1981

Data Provided By:
Dr.JENNIFER SCRUGGS
(205) 934-6600
700 18th St S # 601
Birmingham, AL
Gender
F
Speciality
Ophthalmologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Matthew G Vicinanzo, MD
(615) 936-2020
1000 19th St S
Birmingham, AL
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Suny-Hlth Sci Ctr At Syracuse, Coll Of Med, Syracuse Ny 13210
Graduation Year: 2000

Data Provided By:
Robert Jeffrey Crain, MD
(205) 325-8620
700 18th St South UAB Ste 601
Birmingham, AL
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Al Sch Of Med, Birmingham Al 35294
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided By:
Samuel Wayne Taylor Jr, MD
(205) 933-2625
1201 11th Ave S Ste 300
Birmingham, AL
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Al Sch Of Med, Birmingham Al 35294
Graduation Year: 1990
Hospital
Hospital: Cooper Green Hosp, Birmingham, Al; Bradford Health Services At Bi, Birmingham, Al
Group Practice: Retina Specialists Of Alabama

Data Provided By:
Dr.John Parker
(205) 933-1077
700 18th St S # 503
Birmingham, AL
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: La State Univ Sch Of Med In New Orleans
Year of Graduation: 1986
Speciality
Ophthalmologist
General Information
Hospital: Uab Eye Foundation
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
4.2, out of 5 based on 2, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Corneal Transplant Eye Surgery

When a normally clear cornea becomes cloudy, it blocks light from reaching the retina. If this happens to you, you and your ophthalmologist may decide that a corneal transplant is needed to improve your vision. A corneal transplant is a surgery in which a diseased cornea is replaced with a clear, healthy, donor cornea. Donor corneas come from people who have agreed to donate their eye tissue after they die to help others regain their sight.

After a donor dies, the corneas are removed and taken to an eye bank, where they are examined to make sure that they are healthy. The cornea is a unique tissue, because unlike other transplanted organs it does not have to be matched to the patient receiving the transplant. The eye bank keeps the donor corneas until they are needed for corneal transplant surgery.

Corneal transplantation is an outpatient surgery performed in the operating room. Most patients are given intravenous sedation and numbing medicine is placed around the eye so that the operation is painless. The diseased cornea is removed using an instrument called a trephine that resembles a cookie cutter. A healthy donor cornea is cut to fit, and then sewn onto place using microscopic sutures. This procedure usually takes 60-90 minutes, followed by a short recovery period...

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