Corneal Transplant Surgery Fairhaven MA

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Pamela A Loerinc, MD
(508) 655-5810
18 N Water St
New Bedford, MA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Boston Univ Sch Of Med, Boston Ma 02118
Graduation Year: 1982

Data Provided By:
Kathleen Theresa Cronin, MD
(508) 517-9275
51 State Rd
North Dartmouth, MA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Hahnemann Univ Sch Of Med, Philadelphia Pa 19102
Graduation Year: 1995

Data Provided By:
David Walter Kielty, MD
(508) 717-0270
500 Faunce Corner Rd Ste 110
North Dartmouth, MA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Miami Sch Of Med, Miami Fl 33101
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided By:
Jay Ronald Rowes, MD
(508) 994-1400
51 State Rd
Dartmouth, MA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Cornell Univ Med Coll, New York Ny 10021
Graduation Year: 1976

Data Provided By:
Joseph Francis Burke Jr, MD
(508) 995-8200
300A Faunce Corner Rd
North Dartmouth, MA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Johns Hopkins Univ Sch Of Med, Baltimore Md 21205
Graduation Year: 1972

Data Provided By:
Leonardo J Velazquez-Estades, MD
(508) 994-1400
51 State Rd
Dartmouth, MA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Puerto Rico
Graduation Year: 2001

Data Provided By:
John E Meehan, MD
(508) 995-8200
300A Faunce Corner Rd Ste 101
North Dartmouth, MA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Allegheny Univ Hosp-Hahneman
Graduation Year: 1996

Data Provided By:
Scott Mitchell Corin, MD
(508) 717-0720
500 Faunce Corner Rd Bldg 100 Ste 110
North Dartmouth, MA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: New York Univ Sch Of Med, New York Ny 10016
Graduation Year: 1983

Data Provided By:
Stephen Francis Sullivan, MD
(508) 994-1400
51 State Rd
North Dartmouth, MA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Harvard Med Sch, Boston Ma 02115
Graduation Year: 1971
Hospital
Hospital: St Lukes Hospital Of New Bedfo, New Bedford, Ma
Group Practice: Eye Health Vision Ctr

Data Provided By:
Jeremy Belknap Whitney, MD
(508) 995-8200
300A Faunce Corner Rd
North Dartmouth, MA
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tufts Univ Sch Of Med, Boston Ma 02111
Graduation Year: 1954

Data Provided By:
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Corneal Transplant Eye Surgery

When a normally clear cornea becomes cloudy, it blocks light from reaching the retina. If this happens to you, you and your ophthalmologist may decide that a corneal transplant is needed to improve your vision. A corneal transplant is a surgery in which a diseased cornea is replaced with a clear, healthy, donor cornea. Donor corneas come from people who have agreed to donate their eye tissue after they die to help others regain their sight.

After a donor dies, the corneas are removed and taken to an eye bank, where they are examined to make sure that they are healthy. The cornea is a unique tissue, because unlike other transplanted organs it does not have to be matched to the patient receiving the transplant. The eye bank keeps the donor corneas until they are needed for corneal transplant surgery.

Corneal transplantation is an outpatient surgery performed in the operating room. Most patients are given intravenous sedation and numbing medicine is placed around the eye so that the operation is painless. The diseased cornea is removed using an instrument called a trephine that resembles a cookie cutter. A healthy donor cornea is cut to fit, and then sewn onto place using microscopic sutures. This procedure usually takes 60-90 minutes, followed by a short recovery period...

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